NOAA

2021 Storm Spotter Classes Go Virtual

Website_Spotter
Registrations now open

Do you have an interest in weather and helping your community? Well we have a great opportunity for you!

The National Weather Service Forecast Office in St. Louis is offering FREE virtual spotter classes to prepare for the heart of severe weather season. If you would like to assist your local community by becoming a volunteer storm spotter and reporting severe weather to the National Weather Service, or if you simply want to learn more about severe weather, consider attending one of our virtual sessions! 

What will be taught in the course?

Attendees are taught the basics of thunderstorm development, storm structure, the features to look for, and where to find them. What, when and how to report information to us at the National Weather Service is also covered.

What will you need at home?

Attendees will need a desktop or laptop computer to view the presentation. Additionally, we will use interactive polling software throughout the presentation which will use your cell phone should you choose to participate in the polling questions!

How do you register?

Registration links will be provided a couple of weeks before the scheduled presentations. The links to register will be placed below with each scheduled date. 

Virtual Storm Spotter Class Dates and Registration Links

Note: These courses may be canceled or changed on short notice due to active weather. NWS will communicate these changes via their website and social media channels.

NWS St. Louis


Sunspots Numbers for September 2019

Sunspot191007

In the last four months the Sun has produced practically no sunspots. There were two in June, two in July, and one in August. The September graph, (above)  shows that the past month was as weak as August, with only one sunspot again.

A periodic solar event called a "grand minimum" could overtake the sun perhaps as soon as 2020 and lasting through 2070, resulting in diminished magnetism, infrequent sunspot production and less ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching Earth — all bringing a cooler period to the planet that may span 50 years.

Doesn't look good for an upturn anytime soon. Read more about what this may mean to ham radio, by Robert Zimmerman at Behind the Black


2019 Storm Spotter Talks - NWS St. Louis

51053073_2319667281398403_7740957198397734912_o

Do you have an interest in weather and helping your community? Well we have a great opportunity for you!

The National Weather Service Forecast Office in St. Louis, in coordination with county emergency managers, are offering storm spotter classes at several locations to prepare for severe weather season. If you would like to assist your local community by becoming a volunteer storm spotter and reporting severe weather to the National Weather Service, or if you simply want to learn more about severe weather, consider attending one of our classes! Classes are normally held in the evening and last approximately 90 minutes.

Attendees are taught the basics of thunderstorm development, storm structure, the features to look for, and where to find them. What, when and how to report information as well as basic severe weather safety are also covered.

Strom Spotter class schedule


mPING crowdsourcing weather reports

46233249_2205408509490948_7897442858653712384_n

ARE RAINDROPS FALLING ON YOUR HEAD? Are you getting hassled by hail? Is snow glistening in your treetops? We need your weather reports for our research!

GET THE mPING APP!

The NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory is collecting public weather reports through a free app available for smart phones or mobile devices. The app is called “mPING,” for Meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground.

mPING reports are immediately archived into a database at The University of Oklahoma, and are displayed on a map accessible to anyone.
To use the app, reporters select the type of weather that is occurring, and tap “submit.” The anonymous reports can be submitted as often as every minute.

WHAT DOES NOAA DO WITH THE REPORT I SEND?

Weather radars cannot “see” at the ground, so mPING reports are used by the NOAA National Weather Service to fine-tune their forecasts. NSSL uses the data in a variety of ways, including to develop new radar and forecasting technologies and techniques.

The apps are available on iTunes and Google Play for use on both phones and tablets. Follow this project and others on the NSSL Facebook page.

The mPING app was developed through a partnership between NSSL, the University of Oklahoma and the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies and was included in Scientific American's list of 8 Apps That Turn Citizens into Scientists.

 


NOAA Space Weather

Latest
The NOAA Space Weather Scales were introduced as a way to communicate to the general public the current and future space weather conditions and their possible effects on people and systems. Many of the SWPC products describe the space environment, but few have described the effects that can be experienced as the result of environmental disturbances. These scales are useful to users of our products and those who are interested in space weather effects. The scales describe the environmental disturbances for three event types: geomagnetic storms, solar radiation storms, and radio blackouts. The scales have numbered levels, analogous to hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes that convey severity. They list possible effects at each level. They also show how often such events happen, and give a measure of the intensity of the physical causes.